Category Archives: training and workshops

RiskScape – Risk Modelling Training, Palu

For some, it wasn’t easy to get to Palu for the Risk Modelling training conducted in Palu 19 – 23 October 2015. Smoke from wild fires closed Palu Airport, and a few participants, and some of the training team missed the first day. Contingency planning wasn’t in place for such an event. Perhaps the economic losses and disruption to people from wild fire in Indonesia could be included in the future risk modelling. Tragically, some hikers died in a wild fire in Java on the day before the workshop. Flights were cancelled many times during our week here and we weren’t sure we were going to get flights out.

The R Team

The training was facilitated by members of the RiskScape team Kate Crowley (NIWA), Sheng-Lin Lin and Mostafa Nayyerloo (GNS Science) along with members of the StIRRRD team from UGM ( Agung Setianto,  Iman Satyarno, Wahyu Wilopo). Gumbert Maylda Pratarma from UGM provided able logistic support.

About 40 participants attended the training coming from the 4 universities that are part of StIRRRD project; Tadulako University (UNTAD), Andalas University (UNAND), Mataram University (UNRAM), and Bengkulu University (UNIB), and from the Emergency Management, Planning, and Public Works offices of Palu, Donggala, and Morowali, Padang, Agam, Kota Bengkulu and Mataram.

The training started with the fundamentals of Risk – Hazards, the exposed Assets (buildings, infrastructure and people) and the interaction between the assets and population and the hazards, known as the Vulnerability. RiskScape is the tool that combines these to calculate the impacts of hazard events in terms of damage and casualties, and the trainees were given a quick look at how the tool works.

Using Riskscape

To reinforce risk fundamentals, group exercises were used to discuss how risk modelling could support DRR activities in their districts and to list the possible impacts of hazards on the exposed assets.

Discussing the issues

For the more technical minded, a look under the hood of RiskScape enabled them to see how hazard layers and vulnerability functions can be loaded into the tool. Concurrently, the remainder discussed the development of hazard values and the basics of developing measures of vulnerability.

Outdoor riskscape session

This led into a discussion about the asset information required, including building and infrastructure attributes and typology, as well as population data, and involved a demonstration of the RiACT tool (Real Time Asset Collection Tool), to be used the next day in the field exercise. Being in Palu, Tadulako University had helped with organising the training, and had gathered significant asset data prior to the workshop using paper forms, the results of this survey presented by Dr Ketut of Tadulako University.

The following morning one half of the group went into the streets of Palu, armed with tablets to collect asset data using the RiACT tool. They collected 75 assets in 2 hours work and downloaded them to a database server.

Getting ready for field action

Field data capture

The remaining group worked through RiskScape tutorials and discussed ‘what if’ scenarios. They also came up with questions/scenarios that they might wish to have modelled in RiskScape to assist in Risk Reduction investment, and the data they would need to do so. These scenarios provided the basis of RiskScape Indonesia action plans to be developed later in the training. The groups swapped sessions the following morning.

Using the data they had collected, and earthquake hazard scenario and vulnerability functions from New Zealand, a Palu earthquake scenario was modelled using RiskScape.

Palu Scenario

The final sessions of the workshop were devoted to developing actions to take the training forward to develop and model the scenarios developed through the workshop. These will require collaboration between the district government departments and the universities involved. Tadulako University and Palu indicated they had data and resources and were ready to go, especially with the asset data collection.

Via the network established here, risk modelling in Indonesia can be developed and inform Disaster Risk Reduction decisions and investment.

StIRRRD New Zealand Comparative Study Programme 5-19th June 2015

The New Zealand StIRRRD team recently hosted a 27 strong delegation from Indonesia for a Comparative Study Tour of Disaster Risk Reduction.  The delegation consisted of representatives from UGM, regional governments and parliaments from the four districts Pesisir Selatan, Bengkulu, Donggala and Mataram, central government representatives including the Director for Disaster Risk Reduction from the National Disaster Mitigation Agency, National Planning and the Ministry for Rural and Underdeveloped Regions and Transmigration. Partner universities, Universitas Andalas, Universitas Bengkulu, Universitas Tadulako, and Universitas Mataram, also attended.  The delegation was led by UGM Vice-Rector for Cooperation and Alumni, Dr. Paripurna Sugarda and was accompanied by a translator, Zamira Tatapamang. Continue reading StIRRRD New Zealand Comparative Study Programme 5-19th June 2015

Bengkulu Action Plan Workshop

Part of the StIRRRD team spent last week in Kota Bengkuku, Sumatra running an DRR Action Plan Workshop and renewing contacts in the Kota. The aim of this visit was to facilitate the production of a draft DRR action plan for Kota Bengkulu. The draft plan was developed during the course of the workshop by participants from local government, NGOs, Bengkulu University and volunteer organisations.

P1120882The first day was largely taken up with technical presentations including introducing the tectonic setting of western Sumatra, the regional geology, the earthquake and tsunami hazard, using GIS to map hazard and risk, coastal erosion, flooding and landsliding.

Continue reading Bengkulu Action Plan Workshop

Action Planning in Donggala, Central Sulawesi

We’re back in Donggala, Central Sulawesi, following on from our introductory visit here in November 2014.

A aerial view of the tip of the western peninsula of Donggala District. Palu Bay to the left and the Malacca Straits to the right.
A aerial view of the tip of the western peninsula of Donggala District. Palu Bay to the left and the Malacca Straits to the right.

This time we’ve worked with local government staff and NGOs to develop a natural hazard risk reduction action plan for Donggala. To prepare for the action plan we first discussed Donggala’s hazards, risks and current risk reduction practices and discussed a range of risk reduction options. As well as StIRRRD team expertise in earthquake engineering, landslide early warning systems, GIS mapping, social science and risk reduction expertise, we also included in our team river flood and debris flow management expertise from local government in New Zealand (James Flanagan and Michael Goldsmith) and tsnuami expert Gegar Prasetya.

Continue reading Action Planning in Donggala, Central Sulawesi

Mataram DRR Action Plan workshop

Part of the StIRRRD team was recently back to Mataram, in the island of Lombok, in the West Nusa Tenggara province. Last year’s introductory visit highlighted main issues around vulnerability to coastal erosion, floods, earthquakes and tsunami. This year, we came back to run a DRR Action Plan workshop with our local BPBD partners, officials and local university. Aside the usual suspects from UGM, GNS Science and NZ MFAT, the StIRRRD team was joined by former-GNS tsunami expert Gegar Prasetya and flood expert James Flanagan from the Wellington Regional Council.

Continue reading Mataram DRR Action Plan workshop

Palu Introductory Visit

P1030416
Palu workshop opening.

 

Palu workshop participants pose for a Group photo.
Palu workshop participants pose for a Group photo.

The StIRRRD team arrived in Palu on 9 November 2014 to kick-off the StIRRRD Activity. Palu is the capital of the Province of Central Sulawesi and is quite a large city with a population of about 350,000. The active Palu-Koro Fault has shaped the landscape, with earthquakes, landslides, and debris flows a common occurrence.

Continue reading Palu Introductory Visit